David Eagleman is the author of one of my favourite books of the last few years: Sum, which imagines 40 different versions of the after-life. You know how book-reviewers say ‘I couldn’t put it down’, well, Sum is the opposite sort of book. It keeps on sparking reveries in you, that make you put the Read more…

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According to the FT, the “most talked-about non-fiction book of the year” is the economist Tyler Cowen’s The Great Stagnation, more of a long essay really, which you can only get in e-book format. It’s worth reading, particularly for what it says about the politics of well-being. Cowen suggests that we in the West are Read more…

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Here are some pics from the Franco-British Council’s fun event on Measuring Well-Being earlier this month. Thanks again to them for organizing it and inviting me. This is David Halpern, the head of the Behavioural Insight (or ‘Nudge’) unit at the Cabinet Office, which is doing interesting work on nudging citizens towards socially beneficial activities. Read more…

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So last week, I sent off an application for a provisional driver’s license (I know, I know – 33 and still can’t drive). At the bottom of the DVLA application was a box asking if I agreed to donate my organs in the event of an accident. An easy way to feel noble, I thought, Read more…

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This is a video of a talk I gave at a mad but wonderful event last night, run by a friend of mine, called the Oliphant Street 6X9 talks – where six speakers talk for nine minutes on various things (I went slightly over my allotted nine minutes…) Last night we had talks on Cardinal Read more…

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